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Big Brother


No, this isn't a write-up on Sunny's careergraph. We're running through the movie titles because if you've seen those movies, you'd get a fair idea what BIG BROTHER is all about. To state that BIG BROTHER is purani wine packed in nayee bottle would be putting it mildly.

Sample these…
* Sunny throws acid on people's faces as if he were distributing chocolates.
* Sunny throws a rapist and his advocate from a skyscraper. The rapist jumps himself, because he has committed a heinous crime. The advocate is thrown, because he's defending the rapist.
* When Sunny hits people, they fly, they glide, they even get buried in the soil.
* When he throws people in air and if the person hits a lamp post, the lamp post actually breaks off.
* That's not all, when he holds an iron rod to hit people, the rod starts melting.

He targets rapists, molesters, pedophiles, erring son and daughter-in-law, dowry-seeking in-laws, all wrong-doers… The public supports him, the ministers hate him… In the final scene, he shoots the prospective Chief Minister at point blank range and empties his gun in the Police Commissioner's chest. And all this happens in the Commissioner's official residence and is being telecast LIVE on Aajtak channel.

To sum up, BIG BROTHER takes you back to the 1980s and 1990s when maar-dhaad, bullets, swords, acid bottles, guns, pistols, bombs, knives et al were the compulsory requirements to make a masala film. Need one add more?

BIG BROTHER starts in New Delhi and travels to Mumbai. It tells the story of a middle class family comprising of Deodhar Gandhi [Sunny Deol], his mother [Farida Jalal], brother [Imran Khan] and sister [Prachi].

Leading a simple and peaceful life, an incident turns their life upside down [the Home Minister's son throws acid on his sister's face] and the family is left with no other option but to leave the city and move to Mumbai under a different guise. They start life afresh and all seems well till the ghosts of the past surface again.

Things reach a point when the protagonist is prodded by his mother to take that course of action which not only avenges their hurt, but also takes on the cause of the aggrieved in the country as a whole. The movement so created gets the support of girls, ladies and the infirm who proudly proclaim him as their 'Big Brother'.

Relying on an age-old story, BIG BROTHER offers nothing new to the viewer. The only question you want to ask Mr. Guddu Dhanoa is, Sir, what exactly prompted you to make such a violent movie? There's an overdose of violence in the film, so much so that you start feeling nauseated. There's comedy too [Raju Shrivasatav and the auto rickshaw sequences] that look like an add-on and completely forced.

While three songs flow in rapid succession at the start, you strongly feel that barring the aarti, the romantic song between Sunny and Priyanka was not required and the MTV-style number looks weird since it doesn't go with Sunny's character in the movie. Cinematography is okay.

Sunny is repeating himself. Priyanka Chopra gets three songs and a few lines to deliver. Danny has a half-baked role. Farida Jalal is passable. Sayaji Shinde plays to the gallery. Govind Namdev is loud. Imran Khan is alright. Shahbaaz Khan is perfect. Prachi is ordinary. Shernaz Patel is good.

On the whole, BIG BROTHER is a poor show. At the box-office, it has some hope at the single screens of North India, that's it.


Producer
Guddu Dhanoa

Director
Guddu Dhanoa

Star Cast
Sunny Deol...... Deodhar Gandhi / Deodhar Sharma
Priyanka Chopra
Shahbaaz Khan
Sayaji Shinde
Farida Jalal...... Seetadevi
Avtar Gill
Danny Denzongpa
Govind Namdeo
Raju Shrivastava
Imran Khan
Suhasini Mulay
Shernaz Patel

Cassettes and CD's on
Tips Music Films

Singers
Shreya Ghosal
Kunal Ganjawala
Ustad Sultan Khan
Sunidhi Chauhan
Zubeen Garg
Udit Narayan
Alka Yagnik
Roop Kumar Rathod
Sadhana Sargam
Anand Raj Anand
Jaspinder Narula

Lyricist
Anil Pandey
Nilesh Mishra
Sameer
Anand Raj Anand
Sandesh Shandilya

Music Director
Sandesh Shandilya
Anand Raj Anand

PRO
Parull Gossain

Official Website Designer
IndiaFM.com - Hungama.com

Publicity Designs
Glamour Design Studio

Story / Writer
Guddu Dhanoa

Life Mein Kabhie Kabhiee


LIFE MEIN KABHIE KABHIEE raises a serious issue. It mirrors a truth you can't shut your eyes to. Most youngsters today are driven by ambition, power, greed and money and can resort to all possible shortcuts in life to realize their dreams. Vikram Bhatt narrates this aspect quite convincingly. The film also drives home one pertinent truth: You can't 'buy' happiness.

There's no denying that the storyline of LIFE MEIN KABHIE KABHIEE is its USP. However, the best of stories/concepts/ideas fizzle out if the storyteller is inept. Thankfully, Bhatt treats the subject with maturity and the ride to the destination is sans roadblocks most of the times.

LIFE MEIN KABHIE KABHIEE isn't your run of the mill saga. There are sequences you identify with. There are portions you relate to. There are incidents that you know occur in reality as well. All this and more is penned and presented with conviction.

But there's a flip side too…
One, the story gets too serious after a point. Now that's a major hiccup since a majority of viewers tilt towards feel-good/light entertainers.
Two, while the first hour is captivating at most times, Bhatt should've put a leash on the second hour. Simply put, the post-interval portions tend to get lengthy and need to be trimmed for a better impact.
Besides, a film like LIFE MEIN KABHIE KABHIEE caters to the sensibilities of those frequenting the multiplexes mainly and that also limits its prospects.

To cut a long story short, LIFE MEIN KABHIE KABHIEE is an engrossing fare that should find its audience at big centres mainly. Sadly, the lack of names having box-office draw will curtail its prospects.

LIFE MEIN KABHIE KABHIEE is the story of five friends, five years, one goal -- happiness.

Manish [Aftab Shivdasani], Rajeev [Dino Morea], Jai [Sameer Dattani], Mona [Nauheed Cyrusi] and Ishita [Anjori Alagh] get drunk and have a bet that who out of them would be the happiest in life. They give themselves five years. At the end of five years, Manish would decide who was the happiest.

All of them have different ideas of happiness --

Rajeev thinks that to be the best in what you do is happiness
Mona thinks fame is happiness
Jai thinks power is happiness
Ishita thinks money is what happiness is all about.

LIFE MEIN KABHIE KABHIEE is the journey of these five friends. It talks of success and failure, triumphs and tribulations, hope and despair, happiness and sadness and of course, the final question. Who will win the bet?

Of late, a majority of Vikram Bhatt-directed films failed to deliver since the emphasis wasn't on script as much on cast/technique. But LIFE MEIN KABHIE KABHIEE stands tall in Bhatt's repertoire. Bhatt handles the complex subject with sensitivity. Despite juxtaposing five stories in the film, not once do you feel that the storyteller should've finished one story first and moved on to the next. Bhatt gets abundant support from screenplay writer Manoj Tyagi, who creates the right drama.

Amongst the five different tracks, at least three are highly absorbing [Nauheed/Anuj/Rajat Bedi, Anjori/Raj Zutshi and Dino/Mohnish Bahl/Ekta], one is plain average [Aftab/Koel] and the fifth [Samir Dattani] starts off well, but totters subsequently. The conclusion to the five stories is in fact the icing on the cake. Almost every story has a sad end [completely justified] and it's this aspect that makes it very real and identifiable, since life is not just a bed of roses. But, as mentioned at the outset, the film tends to get too serious and intense, which may be difficult for an average moviegoer to absorb.

Lalit Pandit's music is soothing. 'Hum Khushi Ki Chah Mein' is a lyrical gem [Sameer], while the title track [at the start of the film] is foot-tapping. 'Gehra Gehra' [the party track] is interesting. Cinematography [Pravin Bhatt] is striking. Dialogues [Girish Dhamija] are excellent. They're the soul of several scenes.

The performances are topnotch! Dino Morea delivers his finest performance so far. Watch him in two sequences -- one, when he wins an award and taunts his brother in his thanks-giving speech and two, when he apologizes to his brother in the end. This film is sure to earn him respect as an actor. Aftab Shivdasani is lovable. He plays the seedha-saadha guy to perfection. Sameer Dattani springs a pleasant surprise. He's slightly stiff initially, but conveys a lot through his eyes subsequently. This youngster has the potential if offered the right roles.

Anuj Sawhney is a complete natural. It's sad that people haven't utilized this talented actor. Even though he's not the focal point of the story, the actor manages to make a strong impact. Nauheed Cyrusi does a good job. From LAKEER to ANWAR to LIFE MEIN KABHIE KABHIEE, she's really evolved into a fine actor.

It takes time to take to Anjori Alagh at the start, but as the reels unfold, you realize that this debutante is indeed talented. She handles a number of dramatic scenes - difficult, since this is her first movie -- with rare maturity. Only thing, she needs to shed a few kilos. Koel Purie is highly dependable yet again.

Raj Zutshi is excellent. Nikita Anand is adequate. Ameen Haji is fair. Ashwini Kalsekar [Raj Zutshi's first wife] is exceptional in the sequence when she confronts Anjori. Rajat Bedi is competent and suits the role. Pinky Harwani and Mushtaq Khan are alright.

On the whole, LIFE MEIN KABHIE KABHIEE is a well-made film, but its serious theme and also its genre will restrict its prospects to multiplexes mainly. At the box-office, the film has the chances to grow with word of mouth.


Producer
Gordhan Tanwani

Director
Vikram Bhatt

Star Cast
Aftab Shivdasani...... Manish Gupta
Dino Morea...... Rajeev Arora
Sameer Dattani...... Jai Gokhale
Anjori Alag...... Ishita Sharma
Nauheed Cyrusi...... Monica
Anuj Sawhney
Koel Puri
Pinky Harwani
Usha Bachani
Raj Zutshi...... Raj Gujral
Mohnish Behl...... Sanjeev
Nikita Anand
Rajat Bedi...... Rohit Kumar
Mushtaq Khan
Yashpal Sharma

Cassettes and CD's on
Times Music

Singers
Shaan
Mahalakshmi Iyer
Shamit
K K
Gayatri Ganjawala
Zubeen Garg
Sunidhi Chauhan
Remo Fernandes
Alka Yagnik

Lyricist
Sameer

Music Director
Lalit Pandit

Executive / Associate / Co-Producer
Ajhia Acharya

Choreography
Piyush Panchal
Raju Khan

Action
Abbas Ali Moghul

Art
Ajay Verekar

Editor
Aarif Shaikh

Screenplay
Manoj Tyagi

Sound
Uday Inamati

Dialogue
Girish Dhamija

PRO
Alok Mathur

Story / Writer
Manoj Tyagi

Bheja Fry

Ideally, the plotline of BHEJA FRY is best suited for a stage play [theatre], but director Sagar Ballary makes an attempt to garnish it with interesting twists to suit the 35 mm format. Only thing, a concept like BHEJA FRY, even though it packs in ample laughs in 12 reels, is strictly for the multiplex junta. Again, not all multiplexes, but select ones. With a title like BHEJA FRY, you expect a wacky fare and it does meet your expectations at times. The incidents take place in one night and unlike IS RAAT KI SUBAH NAHIN [different genre, but incidents unfold in one night], BHEJA FRY stresses on humor.

Whether it's the rift between a married couple [Rajat Kapoor, Sarika] or the other people involved in their lives [Milind Soman, Bhairavi Goswami] or a man finding out that his wife is cheating on him [Ranveer Shorey], Ballary injects humor in every situation. Serious moments? Don't look for it in BHEJA FRY.

In a nutshell, BHEJA FRY is a time pass fare that doesn't tax your bheja. It has its limitations since it caters to a select audience, but the film dares to push the envelope further.

Ranjeet Thadani [Rajat Kapoor], a music company executive, hurts his back the night he has found a prize catch for a weekly bring-your-idiot talent dinner hosted by his friends and him. He ends up spending the evening with this idiot, Bharat Bhushan [Vinay Pathak], who tries to help him get his wife [Sarika] back, who left him earlier that day. The result is utter chaos let loose by the idiot, who cannot do a single thing without messing it up further.

The plot turns around to be a series of mini disasters that leave Ranjeet's comfortable life in ruins.

It's difficult to make people laugh and director Sagar Ballary walks a difficult path in his directorial debut. But what bails him out are a fairly interesting screenplay [Sagar Ballary, Arpita Chatterjee] and most importantly, an actor who gets it right in every scene -- Vinay Pathak.

There are times when you truly enjoy the jokes, but there're also times when you refuse to flex your facial muscles since the humor appears forced. The best moments are those when Vinay calls up various people [Milind, Bhairavi, Ranveer, Sarika], but ends up messing things. From the writing point of view, the track between the couple [Rajat, Sarika] is the weakest since on one hand they seem like a perfectly normal couple [the husband gifts his wife a swanky car] and minutes later, the wife walks out of the house. Kya hua? Pata nahin!

The film relies on humorous lines and one-liners and the dialogues are enjoyable at most times. There's no scope for music in the film, but the lone track is strictly okay.

Vinay Pathak is the star of the show. He looks every inch a simpleton who's ready to become the bakra. He says everything with a straight face, that's one of the reasons why this performance works. His timing is simply fantastic.

Rajat Kapoor is alright. Sarika doesn't get much scope. Milind Soman enacts his part well. Ranveer Shorey goes over the top this time. Bhairavi Goswami exudes oomph, but needs to work on her facial expressions. Tom Alter, Harsh Chhaya and Ikhlaque Khan get limited scope.

On the whole, BHEJA FRY has its enjoyable moments, but it's the type of cinema that would appeal to the multiplex junta of a few cities only. An effort like this will find more patronage on DVDs/Satellite TV than the ticket window.

Provoked

Unfortunately, PROVOKED works in bits and spurts. As a story, your heart goes out to Kiranjit Ahluwalia, but as a film, sorry, PROVOKED is akin to a balloon with a leak.

Where does it slip? The screenplay isn't power-packed. The sequences between Ash and the cell-mate are interesting. So are the ones between Ash and her drunkard/philandering/abusive husband Naveen Andrews. But the drama doesn't work in entirety.

The problem with PROVOKED is its screenplay. It lacks the power to grab your attention. In a nutshell, PROVOKED may be a well-intentioned film, but it fails to make an impact.

Set in London, PROVOKED is the traumatic story of a battered Punjabi housewife and mother of two, Kiranjit Ahluwalia [Aishwarya Rai]. Unable to bear the brutality of her alcoholic husband Deepak Ahluwalia [Naveen Andrews], she takes revenge by setting him on fire. Charged with first-degree murder, she is sentenced to life imprisonment, where she befriends her cell-mate, a white woman named Veronica Scott [Miranda Richardson], from whom she learns English.

Her cell-mate is so moved by her story that she asks her step-brother Lord Edward Foster [Robbie Coltrane], a highly respected queen's counsel, to file her appeal. Her case comes to the notice of a motley group of South Asian social workers running an under-funded organization called Southall Black Sisters. They bring her plight to the attention of the media by organizing rallies to gather public support for her freedom.

She is ultimately freed by the judicial system in a landmark case and most importantly, reunited with her children.

Director Jagmohan Mundhra's choice of the subject is right, but PROVOKED lacks soul [a captivating drama]. The story had the ingredients to work as a cinematic interpretation, but the writers [Carl Austin, Rahila Gupta] haven't utilized the opportunity to the optimum. What you carry home are flashes, not the film in entirety. In fact, you don't feel euphoric when the protagonist is pronounced 'non-guilty' and is set free in the end. That's another flaw!

Besides, the narrative seems stretched at places. A few sequences come across as repetitive and are responsible for an unenthusiastic impact. Besides the writing, the execution of the material doesn't touch your heart or move you to tears. Madhu Ambat's cinematography captures the mood of the film well. A.R. Rahman's background score is appropriate.

The one aspect that's absolutely flawless is the choice of the actor enacting the role of the protagonist -- Aishwarya Rai. Stunning is the word that has often been used for this ethereal beauty, but for a change, you want to use this word for her performance in this film. Her work in PROVOKED easily ranks amongst her best.

Naveen Andrews leaves a mark, but there was scope to develop his character better. Miranda Richardson is topnotch. Nandita Das doesn't work. Rebecca Pidgeon is okay, while Robbie Coltraine is effective.

On the whole, PROVOKED rests on a lackluster screenplay and that's its biggest flaw. At the box-office, the film might appeal to a tiny section of audience, but even they wouldn't take to the film completely. Dull.



Producer
Sunanda Murali Manohar

Director
Jagmohan Mundhra

Star Cast
Aishwarya Rai
Naveen Andrews
Robbie Coltrane
Miranda Richardson
Nandita Das
Rebecca Pidgeon
Steve Mcfadden
Nicholas Irons
Raji James
Deborah Moore

Music Director
A R Rahman

Background Music
A R Rahman

Executive / Associate / Co-Producer
Murli Mahnohar
Firuzi Khan
Vinod Popat

Cinematography
Madhu Ambat

Editor
Jagmohan Mundhra
Sanjeev Mirajkar

Screenplay
Carl Austin
Rahila Gupta

Costume
Sarah Tapscott

Story / Writer
Jagmohan Mundhra

Shakalaka Boom Boom

After attempting desi movies in the past, Darshan Sr. goes videshi with SHAKALAKA BOOM BOOM. It's a modern-day story set in the U.S. [filmed in South Africa], but it packs in varied emotions like envy, jealousy, insecurity, anxiety, manipulation and anger in those 2 + hours.

Darshan Sr. hops on to a new lane and tries to explore a genre that's a contrast from what he has been associated with in the past. Sure, the glossy look and stunning locales catch your eye, but Darshan's take on AMADEUS is captivating at several points, especially the second hour.

Wait, there are loose ends as well. The writing could've been tighter. Also, since it revolves around the music industry, there're songs and more songs. The film reaches its crescendo in the pre-climax, but the finale could've been better thought of. Yet, despite the oddities, the plusses outnumber the minuses here.

In a nutshell, SHAKALAKA BOOM BOOM successfully peeps into the minds of the overtly ambitious youngsters who'd stoop to any level to attain their dreams and desires. Watch it, you'd enjoy it!

Set against a backdrop of the international music industry, SHAKALAKA BOOM BOOM delves into the complex relationship of two dramatically different men who have but one thing in common -- their passion for music. If ruthless, manipulative, cut-throat… is considered synonymous with the music industry, these terms certainly do not apply to AJ [Bobby Deol], the most loved, the most popular singer/composer New York has seen.

If prodigious talent, passion, attitude… is considered synonymous with the music industry, then Reggie [Upen Patel] fits the bill. Young and hugely talented, he hungers for what AJ has; he craves to be where AJ is -- on the top. Into the lives of these two men enter two beautiful women -- aspiring singer Ruhi and ambitious PR professional Sheena.

On the professional front, Ruhi [Kangana Ranaut] admires and looks up to AJ. On the personal level, she has been wooed and won over by Reggie. On the professional front, Sheena [Celina Jaitley] has done a lot for Reggie. On the personal level, she holds a huge grudge because he has spurned her.

As ambition, manipulation and desperation take centre stage, Ruhi and Sheena become pawns in a ruthless game.

Director Suneel Darshan takes the tried and tested path to introduce his characters. In fact, the story movies lazily in the initial portions, but smells coffee and wakes up with Upen's arrival. The sequences between Bobby and Kangana are least interesting, but every time Bobby and Upen come face to face, you like the intensity.

It's the twist in the tale at the intermission point -- Bobby's indecent proposal to Kangana -- that saves the film from mediocrity. The mind-games Bobby adopts to destroy Upen from the music scene takes the film to its peak. In fact, Bobby's manipulative moves -- being goody-goody on face but backstabbing at the slightest opportunity -- keeps you charged.

Rajesh Pandey's screenplay has its loose ends. The interaction between Bobby and his guru [Govind Namdev] gets monotonous after a point. Even the end could've been impactful. Yet, in all fairness, the writing in the second half is shades better than the first hour.

Suneel Darshan's execution of the subject material is up to the mark. The undercurrent of tension whenever Bobby and Upen come face to face and also Bobby's manipulations are well filmed by the storyteller. But Darshan can easily trim the film by about 10 minutes. The Bobby - Govind Namdev track can be reduced, while a song or two can easily be chopped off.

Himesh Reshammiya's music is ear-pleasing and the choreography, eye-catching. A couple of tunes stand out, including the title track, 'Thade Vaste' and 'Namumkin' [filmed on an exotic, breath-taking locale]. The choreography [Bosco-Caesar] is fantastic. In fact, the choreography only uplifts the songs further. Dialogues [Anurag Kashyap] are alright, but a few lines [especially Anupam's advice to Upen at the airport] are really well-worded.

Both Bobby and Upen get fabulous roles and the two actors make the most of it. Bobby is one of the most under-rated actors around. His work has been consistent all through, but one tends to overlook this talented actor's abilities all the while. Watch him go negative in SHAKALAKA BOOM BOOM and you'd agree that he's amongst the best in the business today. His outburst in the end is remarkable.

Upen gets a complex role so early in his career and though there're a few rough edges [expected], the youngster is confidence personified. Watch him take on Bobby with his 'I am the best' attitude and you know this guy knows his job well. Upen is not just a show-stopper when it comes to looks, but has the potential to climb the ladder as an actor. SHAKALAKA BOOM BOOM proves it.

Celina is slightly awkward initially, but enacts the role with grey shades very well. Kangana is likeable. She looks stunning and matches it up with a fine performance. Anupam Kher has a small role, which he portrays like a seasoned actor. Dalip Tahil, Seema Rahmani, Govind Namdev, Viveck Vaswani and Asrani are adequate.

On the whole, SHAKALAKA BOOM BOOM is a well-crafted entertainer and lives up to the expectations of its target audience -- the youth. At the box-office, its business at the multiplexes will help it generate good revenue, making it a profitable proposition for its investors.


Producer
Suneel Darshan

Director
Suneel Darshan

Star Cast
Bobby Deol...... AJ
Upen Patel...... Reggie
Celina Jaitley...... Sheena
Kangna Ranaut...... Ruhi
Asrani
Anupam Kher
Dilip Tahil
Seema Rahmani
Govind Namdeo
Vivek Vaswani
Panchali Gupta
Nikhil Patil

Cassettes and CD's on
T-Series

Singers
Himesh Reshammiya
Akruti Kakkar
Shaan
Sunidhi Chauhan
Kunal Ganjawala

Lyricist
Sameer

Music Director
Himesh Reshammiya

Background Music
Viju Shah

Executive / Associate / Co-Producer
M. Riaz

Cinematography
Surendra Rao

Choreography
Bosco
Caesar

Action
Abbas Ali Moghul

Art
Wasiq Khan
Gautam Sen

Editor
Sanjay Sankla

Screenplay
Rajesh Pandey

Dialogue
Anurag Kashyap

Costume
Manish Malhotra

PRO
Parull Gossain
Alok Mathur
Parag Desai

Processing Labs
Adlabs Films Ltd

Promos
Surge

Publicity Designs
Himanshu Nanda
Rahul Nanda

Publicity Stills
Shruti Chowdhary

Story / Writer
Suneel Darshan

Black Friday

BLACK FRIDAY, directed by Anurag Kashyap, is one such film!

Who can ever forget the devastating 1993 Mumbai blasts? The tragedy not only shook Mumbai and the rest of India, but also hit headlines across the world. What triggered off these blasts? Who engineered those attacks? Who were behind this act of terrorism? As a Mumbaiite, a number of questions haunted you then.

BLACK FRIDAY provides the answers!

Anurag Kashyap tells you about the conspiracy and conspirators, the people who engineered the heinous and monstrous crime, the blasts and the aftermath. A number of sequences in the narrative catch you unaware, they are disturbing, they evoke emotions such as shock and sadness in you, they make you go into an introspection mood because it revolves around real people who lost their loved ones in real life… That’s one of the reasons why BLACK FRIDAY works as a film!


Certain films are beyond box-office. You don’t look at the balance sheet at the end of the day, calculating the crores the investors may’ve earned or lost. It’s not about making money here [if the investors do, great!], but all about documenting a tragedy you can never erase from your memory. The personal losses, the pain, the sorrow… Even if the wounds may have healed, the scars will always remain.

BLACK FRIDAY is based on the events leading up to and the investigation thereafter of the 1993 Mumbai bomb blasts. The 1993 Mumbai blasts left 300 + dead and a 1,000 + injured. Based on S. Hussain Zaidi’s book, the film takes one into the heart of the conspiracy behind the Mumbai blasts and the massive follow-up investigation by giving detailed account of planning, execution and back-end operations of the same.

1.25 p.m.: The first blast occurs at the Bombay Stock Exchange.
2.45 p.m.: Blast at Worli Passport Office.
A series of explosions take place at Air India Building, Century Bazaar shopping centre, adjacent to Shiv Sena Bhavan at Dadar, Zaveri Bazar, compound of Plaza cinema, 18th floor of Sea Rock Hotel in Bandra, Centaur Hotel, Juhu, Centaur Hotel, Santacruz.

The clues begin to surface…

The story of BLACK FRIDAY is narrated in the most convincing manner. Unlike the trend of giving screen names to characters, Anurag Kashyap uses real-life names and that only adds to the authenticity. Besides, Kashyap’s handling of a number of sequences is hair-raising…

    * The investigations begin with the cross-examination of Asgar [Yusuf] Muqadam, the manager of Tiger Memon’s company. The interrogation in the police lock-up is electrifying.

    * The execution of the plan -- people disbursing to different areas -- gives a clear idea of how the heinous crime was carried out.

    * Badshah’s journey from Delhi to Rampur [Uttar Pradesh] to Jaipur to Tonk to Jaipur again [Rajasthan] and the tiff over the passport gives you goose bumps.

    * The argument between Additional Commissioner of Police Rakesh Maria and Badshah during the interrogation is superb. The war of words between the two [especially Maria’s lines] are clapworthy.

    * The training in Pakistan is an eye-opener.

Anurag Kashyap deserves the highest praise for handling the subject material with utmost sensitivity. It’s a daringly unusual attempt and only someone with courage could’ve made a film on this tragedy. Besides, Kashyap’s storytelling is very different -- the film unfolds in chapters -- yet every chapter is so efficiently handled that you don’t want to move your eyes from the screen. It’s only towards the end [Tiger Memon addressing a group of people] that makes you decipher the reason behind the blasts. In a way, the film moves in reverse order as far as the chronology of events are concerned.

Another aspect that needs to be highlighted is the background score, which only enhances the impact. Cinematography [S. Natarajan Subramaniam] is first-rate. The red tones used during Rakesh Maria’s interrogation sequences are truly imaginative. The blast sequences [Sham Kaushal] are brilliant. In fact, the use of slow motion and crane shots makes the carnage look authentic.

BLACK FRIDAY is embellished with superior performances, but topping the list is Pawan Malhotra, who enacts the role of Tiger Memon with gusto. Easily one of the finest performances witnessed on the Hindi screen, the actor deserves distinction marks for a terrific portrayal.

Kay Kay [Additional Commissioner of Police Rakesh Maria] is splendid. He conveys so much through his eyes. Aditya Shrivastava [Badshah] excels yet again. Zakir Hussain is adequate. Arbaaz Ali Khan looks the character. Pankaj Jha is effective. Pratima Kazmi is alright. Vijay Maurya’s resemblance to underworld don Dawood Ibrahim is amazing. There are a number of characters in the film and each of them is natural.

On the whole, BLACK FRIDAY is an outstanding piece of work. One of the finest products to come out of Mumbai, this one is a hard-hitting film that has the courage to say what it says. Do yourself a favor: Watch BLACK FRIDAY. Hindi cinema at its best!

Traffic Signal

Like PAGE 3, TRAFFIC SIGNAL is more of a collage of moments than a cohesive script.

A flourishing 'industry' exists at the signals and those who engineer and run the 'empire' include gangsters and politicians. Actually, you need to have a strong stomach to absorb the characters depicted in TRAFFIC SIGNAL. This is no glossy, feel-good, escapist cinema that has actors dressed in designer outfits and breaking into songs in the Swiss Alps. The plot is stationed at a traffic signal, the characters are shabby to look at, they wear tattered clothes and the lingo they speak is outright pedestrian, coarse and uncouth.

Madhur dares to travel a path no one has traversed in the past. Although TRAFFIC SIGNAL rests on a thin plot, the experience of watching a never-seen-before world is its USP.

There are films that entertain. There are films that enlighten. TRAFFIC SIGNAL belongs to the latter category. This one doesn't get preachy. It just opens your eyes and mind to a deglam world that exists in the glam cities of India.

Silsila [Kunal Khemu], a young orphan, who was born and who took his first tiny step at the Signal, is now its manager. For him, the Signal is his workplace and a home where he lives. He loves all those working at the signal, which in a way is his family, but would spare nobody when it comes to business.

Silsila's mentor Jaffar [D. Santosh] is the collector of his region. Both Jaffar and Silsila work for the local Mafioso, Haji [Sudhir Mishra]. Inherent in the social structure lies a nexus between the local mafia and politicians, though at that level Silsila is almost non-existent.

Yet, by a force of circumstance, Silsila gets drawn into the bigger game and finds himself responsible for the annihilation of his own world. What would Silsila do in such a situation? Silsila knows that he can never take on Haji, who is too powerful and way beyond him. Yet, no matter what and how, he has to get his life and the lives of his family at the Traffic Signal back on track.

Like PAGE 3, TRAFFIC SIGNAL is about assorted characters. There's a kid called Tsunami, who has lost his parents in the Tsunami. There's a socialite who likes toyboys. There's a girl from Gujarat who sells traditional outfits. There's a hooker who has a soft corner for a drug addict. The drug addict, in turn, has his own story to tell. There's a gay who's part of the flesh trade. And, of course, there's the 'manager' of this traffic signal -- the protagonist.

Madhur doesn't peep into every character's lives. All he does is introduce the characters that breathe the same air, but live on the mean streets. Actually, the story begins in the middle of the second half and the twist in the tale [the engineer/Manoj Joshi is shot dead by goons] reflects on the times we live in.

The climax is unconventional. There's no herogiri or bhashanbaazi here. The protagonist doesn't fight the evil forces single-handedly. He can't, he's too insignificant in front of them and he knows his shortcomings. And the only recourse he sees is approaching the law.

Director Madhur Bhandarkar's choice of the subject is laudable, although one wishes that there were ample dramatic moments in the narrative. Besides, the subject material will have its share of admirers and adversaries. Yet, there's no denying that the film has some brilliant moments. The Ranveer-Konkona track [including Ranveer's sad demise], the entire track of Manoj Joshi [right till his assassination] and the track of a beggar and the rich Gujarati businessman [with a turning point in a multiplex] are superb. From the writing point of view [writers: Sachin Yardi and Madhur Bhandarkar], the penultimate 25 minutes are captivating, but the film ends on an abrupt note. Ideally, there should've been a strong culmination to the tale.

Special mention has to be made of the costumes worn by the characters [costume designer: Shefalina]. They look real! Ditto for the makeup; it lends the required authenticity to the characters. Mahesh Limaye's cinematography adds to the natural look. Being a slice-of-life film, there's not much scope for the song-n-dance routine, but the theme song has rich lyrical value, while 'Aai Ga' is aimed at the hoi polloi.

The ones who stand out with more than commendable performances include Kunal Khemu, Konkana Sen Sharma and Ranveer Shorey. Kunal Khemu looks the character and emotes his part with admirable precision. Konkona Sen Sharma breathes life in her role. Ranveer Shorey steals the show with a superb portrayal. Upendra Limaye is first-rate. Neetu Chandra does reasonably well. D. Santosh is able. Well-known director Sudhir Mishra leaves a mark as an actor. Manoj Joshi is perfect.

On the whole, TRAFFIC SIGNAL is a slice-of-life film and that is its USP. This deglam film should find a good share of supporters for its theme and also for the execution of the penultimate 25 minutes. At the box-office, the film has two major advantages -- a brand called Madhur Bhandarkar that has cultivated its loyal audience with films like CHANDNI BAR, PAGE 3 and CORPORATE and of course, the right release period. TRAFFIC SIGNAL being the only release this week and the absence of a major film till 16th February will give ample time to its distributors to recover their investments and more. In a nutshell, it's a 'Green' signal for its investors!

Director
   Madhur Bhandarkar

Star Cast
   Neetu Chandra...... Rani
   Kunal Khemu...... Silsila
   Konkona Sen Sharma...... Noorie
   Ranvir Shorey...... Dominic D'Souza
   Sudhir Mishra...... mafia don
   Upyendra Limaye...... Langda Manya
   D Santosh
   Sameer Khan...... Paaya
   Sandeep Kulkarni
   Manoj Joshi
   Nassar Abdulla
   Madhu Sharma

Cassettes and CD's on
   Sony Music

Singers
   Bhupinder
   Hariharan
   Sangeet Haldipur
   Kunal Ganjawala
   Yogita Pathak
   Vaishali Samant
   Bhavika
   Vinod Rathod
   Baba Sehgal
   Neerja Pandit
   Raj Pandit
   Naveen Prabhakar
   Kailash Kher
   Jagjit Singh
   Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
   Ustad Sultan Khan
   Chitra

Lyricist
   Sameer
   Kailash Kher
   Jagjit Singh
   Khilesh Sharma

Music Director
   Raju Singh
   Shamir Tandon
   Kailash
   Jagjit Singh
   Hardip Sidhu
   Prempal Hans
   Sandesh Shandilya

Cinematography
   Mahesh Limaye

Screenplay
   Madhur Bhandarkar
   Sachin Yardi

Costume
   Shefalina

Story / Writer
   Madhur Bhandarkar
   Sachin Yardi

Parzania

The wounds may have begun to heal, but the atrocities leave behind scars that are difficult to conceal. PARZANIA doesn’t talk of politicians or the reasons that triggered off the riots. It tells you of a family whose lives go topsy-turvy during the riots.

Allan [Corin Nemec], an American, arrives in Ahmedabad searching for answers, praying to find internal peace and understand the world and his troubled life. Allan has chosen India as his school and Gandhi as his subject. It’s here that he meets Cyrus and his loving family.

Cyrus [Naseeruddin Shah] lives with his wife Shernaz [Sarika], son Parzan [Parzan Dastur] and daughter Dilshad [Pearl Barsiwala]. Communal riots break out in the city and the Hindus target this housing colony. In the midst of terror and violence, Parzan disappears. The heart-broken family begins their search for Parzan.

PARZANIA packs in a solid punch in those two hours. The story actually takes off when hundreds of Hindus attack the colony. The helpless residents find themselves in a quandary. From this point onwards, right till the finale, PARZANIA has the power to keep you glued to the proceedings.

Sure, the pace drops in the second hour, when Cyrus and Shernaz begin their frantic search for the missing kid, but the narrative reaches its crescendo during the concluding reels [people testifying before the Commission]. It wouldn’t be erroneous to state that the penultimate twenty minutes are the highpoint of the film, especially Sarika’s statement to the Commission.

Director Rahul Dholakia has handled the subject material with utmost sensitivity. Also, he has extracted topnotch performances from every member of the cast. Cinematography is of standard. The riot portions [Sham Kaushal] are expertly handled.

Naseer is brilliant in a role that seems right for him, but it’s Sarika who outshines everyone. Natural to the core, she displays anguish and sorrow with amazing maturity. The two kids are alright, although the girl gets more scope. Corin Nemec does a fine job. Raj Zutshi makes his presence felt. The actress enacting the role of Nikhat [who’s saved by a Hindu] is tremendous.

On the whole, PARZANIA is a well-made film that’s targeted at viewers of serious cinema.

Producer
   Rahul Dholakia
   K B Sareen
   Kamal Patel

Director
   Rahul Dholakia

Star Cast
   Naseruddin Shah
   Sarika
   Master Farzan Dastoor
   Sheeba Chaddha
   Raj Zutshi
   Asif Basra
   Pearl Barsiwalla
   Corin Nemec

Music Director
   Zakir Hussain

Executive / Associate / Co-Producer
   Munna Rizvi
   Corin Nemec
   Mihir Desai
   Sumit Khanna
   Ken Greenblatt

Editor
   Aarif Shaikh

Screenplay
   Rahul Dholakia
   David N Donihue

Sound
   Manoj Sikka

Costume
   Shanaz Vahanvaty

PRO
   Parag Desai

Salaam-E-Ishq

Let's get to the root of the problem right away. Where does this desi adaptation of LOVE ACTUALLY falter?
[a] Barring two stories, the remaining stories are not well etched. It looks like a disjointed effort. And also amateurish at times. More on that later!

[b] The style of narrating the stories is abstract. It takes time to get a hang of things. And when you actually fathom what's going on, you realize that its appeal is restricted to a thin section of moviegoers. For the majority of viewers, especially the masses, absorbing the six stories running simultaneously is as difficult as sipping lassi, sherbet, cola, juice and milk simultaneously.

[c] The film suffers -- and badly at that -- due to its unwarranted length. Either Nikhil Advani fell in love with the film and lost all objectivity or the editor doesn't know his job well and forgot to use the scissors. Or, perhaps, the editor had no say in the matter. What could've been conveyed in a concise format of 2 + hours is stretched to a boring 3.30 hours. The film goes on and on and on endlessly!

Nikhil Advani proved his abilities in his directorial debut KAL HO NAA HO, but the problem with SALAAM-E-ISHQ is that he tries to pack too many stories and too many incidents in one film. Never stretch a rubber band beyond a point. It's bound to give away. SALAAM-E-ISHQ tests the patience of the viewer for this very reason!

On the brighter side, Nikhil has handled certain sequences remarkably. In fact, he does pull off some amazingly well-tuned moments as well as some funny ones. But as the captain of the ship, he should've ensured that the writing is foolproof. Either he got carried away with the script or he realized he had to do justice to the magnum cast, resulting in this labour of love proving one laborious exercise for the watcher.

To cut a long story short, SALAAM-E-ISHQ disappoints big time!

Story 1:
Tehzeeb [Vidya Balan] wakes up in the morning to find a small diamond pendant by her bedside. It's an anniversary gift from her romantic husband Ashu [John Abraham]. Things take a turn when Tehzeeb is involved in a tragic train accident. She loses memory!

Story 2:
Raju [Govinda], a cabbie, meets his 'dream girl' Stephanie [Shanon Esra], who's come looking for Rohit [Kushal Punjabi], her boyfriend, in India. Rohit decides to marry an Indian girl of his parents' choice, while Stephanie gradually falls in love with Raju.

Story 3:
Vinay [Anil Kapoor] leads a perfect life. He has a loving wife Seema [Juhi Chawla] and two kids. Also, a perfect job in London. But things change when he bumps into Anjali [Anjana Sukhani]. Anjali comes from a world that Vinay only dreams of. Vinay's life undergoes a tumultuous change.

Story 4:
Kamini [Priyanka Chopra], an item girl in Bollywood, aspires for the coveted heroine's role in a Karan Johar film. She devises a plot to change her image by announcing that she's into a serious relationship with a fictitious character Rahul. Suddenly, Rahul [Salman Khan] enters the scene from nowhere!

Story 5:
Shiven [Akshaye Khanna], the most eligible bachelor in New Delhi, is engaged to get married in the next 10 days. But he develops cold feet. He wants to break off the engagement. And he does so by hurting his fiancé Gia [Ayesha Takia] in the bargain. Gradually, he begins to realize that he is incomplete without Gia.

Story 6:
Ramdayal [Sohail Khan] is a middle class Haryanvi, married to Phoolwati [Isha Koppikar]. No matter how and where Ramdayal tries to fulfill that burning desire, something goes wrong.

Now let's dissect each of the stories…
Salman-Priyanka: This one sends out confusing signals. The entire exercise -- Priyanka desperately wanting to star in a Karan Johar film and Salman latching on to her -- is a shining example of amateurish writing. Salman loves Priyanka, but she loves her career. So how does this ambitious woman change so suddenly? Salman hardly does anything dramatic to bring about a revolution in her life. And Karan Johar's phone calls to Priyanka make the film-maker sound so desperate. In fact, Nikhil has belittled his mentor [Karan Johar] and made him appear like an opportunistic film-maker!

Anil-Juhi-Anjana: An interesting concept. Mirrors the truth. But Anil's transformation [shaves off his moustache, wears bizarre outfits and breaks into a dance] takes it away from reality. The rift between Anil-Juhi is brilliant, but Anjana's character gets a hasty exit. Is the other woman always black?

Govinda-Shanon: A thin story that's stretched unnecessarily. Yet, the conversations between the desi babu and videsh mem keep you engrossed. The culmination to this story [at the wedding] is interesting.

John-Vidya: Clearly, the best story of the lot. And what takes it further is the twist in the tale -- Vidya losing her memory and John trying every possible thing to revive her memory. The sequence at Akshaye's residence is outstanding.

Akshaye-Ayesha: Believable. But too verbose to the point of getting boring. Also, the sequences could've been much more convincing. The incident that brings about a change in his life [John-Vidya sequence] is apt.

Sohail-Isha: Crass. Tries so hard to be funny, but isn't. Perhaps, the front benchers might like it. This track disappears suddenly. Kya hua, Director sahab?

Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy's music is pleasant. 'Dil Kya Kare' [rendered beautifully by Adnan Sami] and the title track are two numbers that stand out. 'Babuji Dheere Chalna' [filmed on Anjana] is another pertinent track that comes at the right place. Piyush Shah's cinematography is excellent. The film bears a consistent look all through.

Of the twelve important characters and the sundry supporting ones, Govinda [suits the role and also does well], Akshaye Khanna [exceptional], John Abraham [dependable], Vidya Balan [wonderful], Shanon Esra [pleasant surprise] and Juhi Chawla [credible] leave a mark.

Salman looks fake. Priyanka hams. Someone should tell her that acting and screeching are two different things. Anil Kapoor looks jaded. Anjana is decent, but her role is half-baked. Ayesha Takia gets minimal scope. Sohail and Isha are hardly there. Amongst supporting actors, Prem Chopra, Tinnu Anand and Vishal Malhotra [Akshaye's friend] are noticeable.

On the whole, SALAAM-E-ISHQ has one major ace -- its massive star cast, which has translated into tremendous hype. But the deficiencies outweigh everything in this enterprise -- disjointed script, abstract style of narrating the story and excessive length [3.30 hours/23 reels]. At the box-office, the tremendous hype will result in a bountiful first weekend, but SALAAM-E-ISHQ lacks the power to walk on its feet after the initial euphoria subsides. The business at multiplexes will be strong in the initial days only, but the film will cut a sorry figure at single screens and also at screens dominated by masses. Highly disappointing!

Producer
   Sunil Manchanda
   Mukesh Talreja
   Nikhil Advani

Director
   Nikhil Advani

Star Cast
   Vidya Balan...... Tehzeeb Hussain Raina
   John Abraham...... Ashutosh Raina
   Govinda...... Raju aka Taxiwala
   Shannon Esrechowitz...... Stephanie aka Dreamgirl
   Priyanka Chopra...... Kkamini
   Salman Khan...... Rahul
   Akshaye Khanna...... Shiven Dungarpur
   Ayesha Takia...... Gia Bakshi
   Sohail Khan...... Ramdayal
   Isha Koppikar...... Phoolwati
   Anil Kapoor...... Vinay Malhotra
   Juhi Chawla...... Seema Bakshi Malhotra
   Anjana Sukhani...... Anjali
   Karan Johar...... voiceover (as himself)
   Aroon Bakshi...... Satpal
   Tinu Anand...... Babu
   Vrajesh Hirjee...... Prem
   Viju Khote...... Amar
   Prem Chopra...... Maj. Gen. Bakshi
   Mangal Kenkre...... Mrs. Bakshi
   Kamini Khanna...... Pammi Chaddha
   Manoj Pahwa...... Surjit Chaddha
   Atul Parchure...... Sukhi
   Kushal Punjabi...... Rohit
   Deepak Qazir...... Joshi
   Saurabh Shukla...... Dotcom
   Vishal Malhotra

Cassettes and CD's on
   T-Series

Singers
   Adnan Sami
   Shilpa Rao
   Shankar Mahadevan
   Loy Mendonca
   Shaan
   Nihira Joshi
   Sonu Nigam
   Shreya Ghosal
   Kunal Ganjawala
   Sadhana Sargam
   Mahalakshmi Iyer
   Kailash Kher

Lyricist
   Sameer

Music Director
   Shankar Mahadevan
   Ehsaan Noorani
   Loy Mendonca

Executive / Associate / Co-Producer
   Jitender Bagga
   Chetan Motiwala

Cinematography
   Piyush Shah

Choreography
   Bosco
   Caesar

Art
   Priya Raghunath

Editor
   Aarti Bajaj

Screenplay
   Nikhil Advani
   Saurabh Shukla
   Suresh Nair

Sound
   Manoj Sikka

Dialogue
   Saurabh Shukla

Costume
   Vikram Phadnis
   Alvira Agnihotri
   Manish Malhotra and Co.

Publicity Designs
   HR Enterprises

Story / Writer
   Nikhil Advani

Risk

RISK, directed by Vishram Sawant, bears an uncanny resemblance to two movies in particular: AB TAK 56 and KAGAAR.

To start with, RISK gives you the feeling of déjà vu constantly. The Mumbai underworld, the cop-gangster-politician nexus, the honest cop facing the heat but bouncing back to settle scores… moviegoers have had their fill of gritty stories. Really, this genre has been beaten to death in Bollywood.

Given the fact that RISK charters a similar path, it's difficult to pinpoint anything path-breaking or novel in director Vishram Sawant's narrative. The only difference is that the cop follows the gangster's commands and does a complete volte-face in the penultimate reels. He shows his true colors by eliminating the don finally!

Another factor that goes against RISK is that it tends to get too violent and brutal. Agreed, the genre demands guns, bullets, blood and gore, but it's a complete put off in today's times. Isn't there an overdose of violence and bloodshed in real life? Aren't newspapers and TV channels devoting ample space to acts of violence, carnage and terrorism? Certain themes are passé already.

Vishram Sawant is an able storyteller. He showed flashes of brilliance in his directorial debut D and in RISK too, Sawant has handled a number of sequences with flourish. But how one wishes, the efficient director had something novel to say in his second outing. He holds tremendous potential, but why is he limiting himself to similar kind of movies?

RISK tells the story of an honest and upright cop Suryakant [Randeep Hooda], the poster boy of Mumbai's police force. His intentions are noble: Eradicate crime from the metropolis and put an end to the illegitimate rule of the don, Khalid [Vinod Khanna], who operates from Bangkok.

But Suryakant faces impediments and perils, is falsely implicated for being hand-in-glove with gangsters and even put behind bars. Khalid plays his cards well and gets Suryakant his uniform back. The don wants to have absolute monopoly over the underworld and uses Suryakant to settle scores with his arch rival [Zakir Hussain].

Unknown to Khalid, Suryakant has his own agenda. He eliminates Khalid's younger brother [Yashpal Sharma] and his trusted aide [Makrand Deshpande]. Khalid is also arrested and deported from Thailand. The battlelines are drawn, a confrontation is inevitable…

Director Vishram Sawant's execution is far more impactful than the subject material. In fact, the story -- besides being oft-repeated -- has a few loose ends that just cannot be ignored. Take for instance the sequence involving the honest cop [Randeep] and the South Indian gangster [Zakir Hussain], who is picked up from the international airport while trying to flee the country. Why doesn't the cop eliminate him, even though he guns down his accomplices? Why does he let him go scot-free?

Also, the cop shoots the dreaded don's brother [Yashpal Sharma], his aide [Makrand Deshpande] and also the Home Minister [Anant Jog] inside the Minister's residence itself. Is it so easy to kill a Minister and walk away without batting an eyelid? Difficult to absorb, isn't it?

Even the climax, when the cop shoots the don inside the prison [it's well executed though], looks like one cinematic liberty. Khalid is no gali ka goonda, he's the all-powerful don and yet, not one police officer fires at Randeep when they know his intentions so clearly [he's charging towards the don's cell to eliminate him].

Although he carries the burden of an oft-repeated story and lackluster screenplay, there's no denying that Vishram Sawant's direction is a notch above the ordinary. You can find faults in the writing, but not in his execution. There's no scope for music in this enterprise and the song at the start ['Hitchki'; music: Akbar Sami; singer: Sonu Kakkad] is strictly passable. Nonetheless, its choreography is interesting. The other track [theme song; music: Bapi-Tutul] registers minimal impact. The background score is first-class. Mahesh Muthuswami's camerawork is perfect.

Randeep Hooda is in terrific form and the role seems tailormade for him. He looks the character and emotes with precision. It's good to see Vinod Khanna after a hiatus. He's energetic all through. Tanushree Dutta gets no scope. She's hardly there. Seema Biswas gets no powerful scenes to compliment her talent. Yashpal Sharma is reasonably good. Makrand Deshpande is wasted. Anant Jog is alright. Zakir Hussain goes over the top. Shiv Subramaniam [DCP] is fair. The actor enacting the role of the Commissioner makes his presence felt. Chetan Pandit [lawyer] is good.

On the whole, RISK is letdown by a weak and predictable script. At the box-office, the Mumbai theme and flavor will restrict its prospects to Mumbai/Maharashtra belt mainly, that too in the single screens mainly. In other circuits, RISK will prove to be a risky proposition for its distributors!

Producer
   Parag Sanghavi

Director
   Vishram Sawant

Star Cast
   Vinod Khanna...... Khalid
   Randeep Hooda...... Suryakant Satam
   Tanushree Datta...... Shraddha
   Seema Biswas...... Devki Vardhan
   Yashpal Sharma...... Arbaaz
   Makrand Deshpande...... Hari
   Zakir Hussain...... Naidu
   Anant Jog...... Sarang
   D Santosh...... Khalid's youngest brother
   Rajendra Sethi
   Ashraf Ul Haq...... informer
   Chetan Pandit...... Devki's lawyer
   Shiv Kumar Subramaniam...... DCP Bhandari
   Suhas Palshikar...... Sauthya
   Ganesh Yadav

Cassettes and CD's on
   HOM Records & Tapes Pvt. Ltd

Singers
   Sonu Kakkar
   Krishna
   Kunal Ganjawala

Lyricist
   Amitabh Varma
   Sandeep Nath
   Sudhir

Music Director
   Akbar Sami
   Bapi
   Tutul
   Sandesh Shandilya

Background Music
   Sandesh Shandilya

Executive / Associate / Co-Producer
   Pramod Sawant

Choreography
   Ganesh Acharya

Editor
   Vivek Shah

Screenplay
   Vishram Sawant

Costume
   Violet Monis
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